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66 Berlinale Awards

66 Berlinale Awards

PRIZES OF THE INTERNATIONAL JURY

Members of the Jury: Meryl Streep (Jury President), Lars Eidinger, Nick James, Brigitte Lacombe, Clive Owen, Alba Rohrwacher and Małgorzata Szumowska

GOLDEN BEAR FOR BEST FILM (awarded to the film’s producer)
Fuocoammare Fire at Sea
by Gianfranco Rosi

SILVER BEAR GRAND JURY PRIZE
Smrt u Sarajevu / Mort à Sarajevo Death in Sarajevo
by Danis Tanović

SILVER BEAR ALFRED BAUER PRIZE for a feature film that opens new perspectives
Hele Sa Hiwagang Hapis
A Lullaby to the Sorrowful Mystery
by Lav Diaz

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST DIRECTOR
Mia Hansen-Løve for
L’ avenir (Things to Come)

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST ACTRESS
Trine Dyrholm in
Kollektivet (The Commune) by Thomas Vinterberg

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST ACTOR
Majd Mastoura in
Inhebbek Hedi (Hedi) by Mohamed Ben Attia

SILVER BEAR FOR BEST SCRIPT
Tomasz Wasilewski für
Zjednoczone stany miłości (United States of Love) by Tomasz Wasilewski

SILVER BEAR FOR OUTSTANDING ARTISTIC CONTRIBUTION
in the categories camera, editing, music score, costume or set design
Mark Lee Ping-Bing for the camera in
Chang Jiang Tu (Crosscurrent) by Yang Chao

BEST FIRST FEATURE AWARD

Members of the Jury: Michel Franco, Enrico Lo Verso and Ursula Meier

BEST FIRST FEATURE AWARD endowed with € 50,000, funded by GWFF
Inhebbek Hedi Hedi
by Mohamed Ben Attia

PRIZES OF THE INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM JURY

Members of the Jury: Sheikha Hoor Al-Qasimi, Katerina Gregos and Avi Mograbi

GOLDEN BEAR FOR BEST SHORT FILM
Balada de um Batráquio Batrachian’s Ballad Ballade der Batrachia by Leonor Teles

SILVER BEAR JURY PRIZE (SHORT FILM)
A Man Returned
Ein Mann kehrt zurück
by Mahdi Fleifel

BERLIN SHORT FILM NOMINEE FOR THE EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS
A Man Returned
Ein Mann kehrt zurück
by Mahdi Fleifel

AUDI SHORT FILM AWARD endowed with € 20,000, enabled by Audi
Jin zhi xia mao Anchorage Prohibited Ankern verboten
by Chiang Wei Liang

PRIZES OF THE JURIES GENERATION

Children’s Jury Generation Kplus

Members of the Jury: Fabian Behrendt, Mathilda Fastabend, Felix Fuentes-Hare, Julian Leisle, Lilia Channary Noack , Mette Maren Schmahl, Fritzi Schneider-Reuter, Moritz Süßenbach, Sophie Tischmann, Tamino Köhne and Irma Weiche

CRYSTAL BEAR for the Best Film
Ottaal The Trap Die Falle
by Jayaraj Rajasekharan Nair

SPECIAL MENTION
Jamais contente Miss Impossible Nie zufrieden
by Emilie Deleuze

CRYSTAL BEAR for the Best Short Film
El inicio de Fabrizio Fabrizio’s Initiation Fabrizios erstes Mal by Mariano Biasin

SPECIAL MENTION
Ninnoc
by Niki Padidar

International Jury Generation Kplus

Members of the Jury: Anne Kodura, Nagesh Kukunoor and Kathy Loizou

THE GRAND PRIX OF THE GENERATION KPLUS INTERNATIONAL JURY
for the best feature-length film, endowed with € 7,500 by the Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk
Rara Rara
by Pepa San Martín

SPECIAL MENTION
Genç Pehlivanlar Young Wrestlers Junge Ringer
by Mete Gümürhan

THE SPECIAL PRIZE OF THE GENERATION KPLUS INTERNATIONAL JURY
for the best short film, endowed with € 2,500 by the Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk
Semele Semele
by Myrsini Aristidou

SPECIAL MENTION
Aurelia y Pedro Aurelia and Pedro Aurelia und Pedro
by Omar Robles and José Permar

Youth Jury Generation 14plus

Members of the Jury: Aaron Bagheri, Vincent Edusei, Emilia Forck, Mira Leskien, Carlotta Saumweber, Tim Schiffer and Esther Siebelitz

CRYSTAL BEAR for the Best Film
Es esmu šeit Mellow Mud
by Renārs Vimba

SPECIAL MENTION
Las plantas Plants
by Roberto Doveris

CRYSTAL BEAR for the Best Short Film
Balcony Balcony
by Toby Fell-Holden

SPECIAL MENTION
Kroppen är en ensam plats The Body Is a Lonely Place by Ida Lindgren

International Jury Generation 14plus

Members of the Jury: Sam de Jong, Petros Silvestros and Liz Watts

THE GRAND PRIX OF THE GENERATION 14PLUS INTERNATIONAL JURY
for the best feature-length film, endowed with € 7,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education)
Las plantas Plants
by Roberto Doveris

SPECIAL MENTION
Zhaleika Zhaleika
by Eliza Petkova

THE SPECIAL PRIZE OF THE GENERATION 14PLUS INTERNATIONAL JURY
for the best short film, endowed with € 2,500 by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education)
O noapte in Tokoriki A Night in Tokoriki by Roxana Stroe

SPECIAL MENTION
Kroppen är en ensam plats The Body Is a Lonely Place by Ida Lindgren

PRIZES OF INDEPENDENT JURIES

PRIZES OF THE ECUMENICAL JURY
Members of the Jury: Marisa Winter (Jury President), Rev. Micah Bucey, Prof. Dr. phil. Hans-Joachim Neubauer, Prof. Aurore Renaut, Callum Ryan and Jacques Vercueil
Competition Fuocoammare (Fire at Sea) by Gianfranco Rosi
Panorama Les premiers, les derniers (The First, the Last) by Bouli Lanners
Forum Barakah yoqabil Barakah (Barakah Meets Barakah) by Mahmoud Sabbagh
ex aequo
Les Sauteurs (Those Who Jump) by Abou Bakar Sidibé, Estephan Wagner and Moritz Siebert

PRIZES OF THE FIPRESCI JURY
Members of the Jury (Competition): José Romero, Mohammed Rouda and Mr. Clarence Tsui Members of the Jury (Panorama): Thomas Abeltshauser, Dana Duma and Carlo Gentile Members of the Jury (Forum): Tara Judah, Alberto Ruiz Ramos and Bettina Schuler
Competition Smrt u Sarajevu / Mort à Sarajevo (Death in Sarajevo) by Danis Tanović
Panorama Aloys by Tobias Nölle
Forum The Revolution Won’t Be Televised by Rama Thiaw

PRIZE OF THE GUILD OF GERMAN ART HOUSE CINEMAS
Members of the Jury: Louis Anschütz, Hans-Jörg Blondiau and Adrian Kutter
24 Wochen (24 Weeks) by Anne Zohra Berrached

CICAE ART CINEMA AWARD
Members of the Jury (Panorama): Tiziano Gamberini, Ewa Kujawińska and Richard Nüsken Members of the Jury (Forum): Michal Matuszewski, Aistė Račaitytė and Lysann Windisch Panorama Grüße aus Fukushima (Fukushima, mon Amour) by Doris Dörrie Forum Ilegitim (Illegitimate) by Adrian Sitaru

LABEL EUROPA CINEMAS
Members of the Jury: Greta Akcijonaite, Mathias Holtz, Malgorzata Kuzdra and Torsten Raab
Les premiers, les derniers (The First, the Last) by Bouli Lanners

Special Mention
Auf Einmal (All of a Sudden) by Aslı Özge
S one strane (On the Other Side) by Zrinko Ogresta

TEDDY AWARD
Members of the Jury: Augustas Čičelis, Alexandra Carastoian, Alice Royer, Dagmar Brunow, Adán Salinas Alverdi, Nosheen Khwaja, Serubiri Moses, Xiaogang Wei and Jay Lin
Best Feature Film Kater (Tomcat) by Händl Klaus Best Documentary/Essay Film Kiki (Kiki) by Sara Jordenö
Best Short Film Moms On Fire (Moms On Fire) by Joanna Rytel
Special Jury Award Nunca vas a estar solo (You’ll Never Be Alone) by Alex Anwandter Special Teddy Award Christine Vachon

MADE IN GERMANY — PERSPEKTIVE FELLOWSHIP
endowed with € 15,000, funded by Glashütte Original
Members of the Jury: Sandra Hüller, Ingo Haeb and Martin Heisler
Janna Ji Wonders for Walchensee Forever

CALIGARI FILM PRIZE
Members of the Jury: Wolfgang Dittrich-Windhüfel, Christine Müh and Rüdiger Suchsland
Akher ayam el madina (In the Last Days of the City) by Tamer El Said

Special Mention
Tempestad by Tatiana Huezo
The Revolution Won’t Be Televised by Rama Thiaw

PEACE FILM PRIZE
Members of the Jury: Matthias Coers, Teboho Edkins, Helgard Gammert, Ulrike Gruska, Michael Kotschi, Lena Müller, Yael Reuveny and Christian Römer
Makhdoumin (A Maid for Each) by Maher Abi Samra

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL FILM PRIZE
Members of the Jury: Meret Becker, Markus Bekko and Dani Levy
Competition Fuocoammare (Fire at Sea) by Gianfranco Rosi
Generation Royahaye Dame Sobh (Starless Dreams) by Mehrdad Oskouei

HEINER CAROW PRIZE
Members of the Jury: Dirk Kummer, Lindsey Merrison and Sabine Söhner
Grüße aus Fukushima (Fukushima, mon Amour) by Doris Dörrie

READERS’ JURIES AND AUDIENCE AWARD

PANORAMA AUDIENCE AWARD
Fiction Film
Junction 48 (Junction 48) by Udi Aloni

PANORAMA AUDIENCE AWARD
Documentary Film
Who’s Gonna Love Me Now? (Who’s Gonna Love Me Now?) by Barak Heymann and Tomer Heymann

TEDDY AUDIENCE AWARD
Théo et Hugo dans le même bateau (Paris 05:59) by Jacques Martineau and Olivier Ducastel

BERLINER MORGENPOST READERS’ JURY AWARD
Fuocoammare (Fire at Sea) by Gianfranco Rosi

TAGESSPIEGEL READERS’ JURY AWARD
Nikdy nejsme sami (We Are Never Alone) by Petr Vaclav

MÄNNER MAGAZIN READERS’ JURY AWARD
Mãe só há uma (Don’t Call Me Son) by Anna Muylaert

PRIZES BERLINALE CO-PRODUCTION MARKET & BERLINALE TALENTS

ARTE INTERNATIONAL PRIZE
endowed with € 6,000
Alvaro Brechner (Spain) for Memories from the Cell

EURIMAGES CO-PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT AWARD
endowed with € 20,000
Cinéma Defacto (France) and Proton Cinema (Hungary) for Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman (Director: Pierre Földes)

Special Mention
Tornasol Films (Spain) for Memories from the Cell (Director: Alvaro Brechner)
Amrion (Estonia) for The Little Comrade (Director: Moonika Siimets)

VFF TALENT HIGHLIGHT PITCH AWARD
endowed with € 10,000
Producer Max Serdiuk (Ukraine) for Tank

Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival

Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival

Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival (BiFan) is the fantastic film festival showcasing a terrific range of alternative films in the genre of science fiction, fantasy, and horror from all around the world. Since its first edition in 1997, BiFan has been introducing more cutting-edge films leading films’ success in Korean market and helping Korean films meeting the international circuit, also established itself as an important forum for diverse spirits of filmmakers and moviegoers. read more…

What Are You Afraid Of? – POLTERGEIST

What Are You Afraid Of? – POLTERGEIST

Blu-ray 3D™ & Blu-ray™ Combo and DVD Wednesday 21 October

Includes Alternative Ending & Extended Cut Featuring Footage
Not Shown at Cinemas

Just in time for Halloween

Poltergeist
Fox 2000 Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures present POLTERGEIST, from legendary filmmaker Sam Raimi (“Spider-Man,” Evil Dead,” “The Grudge”) and director Gil Kenan (“Monster House”). It contemporises the 1982 classic about a family whose suburban home is haunted by evil forces. When terrifying apparitions escalate their attacks and hold the youngest daughter captive, the family must come together to rescue her before she disappears forever.

Kenan directs from a screenplay by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Lindsay-Abaire. The film is produced by Raimi and Rob Tapert, p.g.a. (“Evil Dead”) via Ghost House Pictures, along with Roy Lee, p.g.a. (“The Departed”). The film is executive produced by J.R. Young (“The Grudge 3”), Audrey Chon (“Changeling”), John Powers Middleton (“The LEGO® Movie”), and Becki Cross Trujillo (“Snitch”).

POLTERGEIST stars Sam Rockwell (“Moon”), Rosemarie DeWitt (“Rachel Getting Married”), Jared Harris (“Mad Men”) and Jane Adams (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”).

With suspenseful storytelling and jaw-dropping visuals, this electrifying take on a spine-chilling classic will haunt you from its early nightmarish moments to its exhilarating climax!

poltergeist 2015

Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray Combo Special Features Theatrical Cut in 3D

  • Extended Cut
  • Alternate Ending
  • Gallery
  • Theatrical Trailers
  • Sneak Peek

DVD Special Features

  • Extended Cut
  • Alternate Ending
  • Gallery
  • Theatrical Trailers

About Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, LLC (TCFHE) is the industry leading worldwide marketing, sales and distribution company for all Fox produced, acquired and third party partner film and television programing. Each year TCFHE expands its award-winning global product portfolio with the introduction of new entertainment content through established and emerging formats including DVD, Blu-ray™, Digital HD and VOD. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment is a subsidiary of 20th Century Fox, a 21st Century Fox Company.

SUMER Movie

SUMER Movie

For unknown reasons, the Earth’s ionosphere has weakened dramatically during the course of the last century, resulting in the collapse of the entire ecosystem. Earth has become an increasingly hostile and uninhabitable place and with no shield to protect it, it is at the full mercy of meteors. read more…

Is ‘Terminator’ Finally Ready for a TV Series?

Is ‘Terminator’ Finally Ready for a TV Series?

The Terminator saga has been an interesting one, to say the very least. The general consensus among critics is that the first two installments can be counted among some of the best sci-fi movies ever made. Once James Cameron left though, things took a turn. Both Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines and Terminator Salvation proved to be duds, in 2003 and 2009 respectively, forever tainting our memories of a once-proud franchise. Between those two movies, a TV show rose (and then quickly fell) in 2007 in the shape of The Sarah Connor Chronicles on FOX. read more…

Philae comet lander ‘wakes up’ from hibernation to resume Rosetta mission

Philae comet lander ‘wakes up’ from hibernation to resume Rosetta mission

Spacecraft makes contact with scientists for first time in seven months after losing power following touchdown on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

From aliens bursting forth from crew members’ chests to onboard computers developing a psychopathic mind of their own, waking from space hibernation rarely results in a happy ending. But a real-life space voyage has bucked the trend of science-fiction counterparts such as Alien and 2001: A Space Odyssey, as one of humankind’s greatest achievements “woke up” to the great relief of its earthbound masters. read more…

Christopher Lee: Remembering An Elegant Master of the Macabre

Christopher Lee: Remembering An Elegant Master of the Macabre

I met Christopher Lee only once, over dinner at the 2013 Locarno Film Festival, where he was due to receive a lifetime achievement award. But even one night with Lee, who died June 7, was something to treasure. At 91, he was a consummate raconteur, spinning tales from a 60-year career in which he had become the very embodiment of the sci-fi, horror and fantasy movies that seep into little boys’ brains and turn them into Tim Burton, Joe Dante, Peter Jackson or George Lucas. At one point, our conversation turned to the subject of “Star Wars,” and the climactic lightsaber battle between Lee’s Count Dooku and the diminutive Yoda in 2002’s “Attack of the Clones,” made when Lee was a mere 80. “I did all of my own dueling in that scene!” Lee exclaimed, adding that he could be found in the Guinness Book of Records as the actor with the most on-screen swordfights.

Was there not also a Guinness category for actor most responsible for conjuring nightmares in the minds of impressionable children? For surely, that is how he entered so many of our lives, as Frankenstein or Dracula or a resurrected mummy in the series of Hammer Studios horror films that kept the actor in steady employ throughout the ’50s and ’60s (and remained staples of independent television stations’ “creature feature” broadcasts well into the ’80s). Lee complained that he was underutilized in many of those films, but then, Lee was the sort of actor whose presence hung in the air even when he wasn’t onscreen, and who, when he was, literally (at 6-foot-5) and figuratively towered over everything around him.

christopher lee

Seeing “The Mummy” (1959) at an impressionable age, at the Tampa Museum of Art (where it was screened, curiously, as part of an exhibition of ancient Egyptian artifacts), I recall having to be escorted from the theater when Lee’s vengeful Kharis breaks into the study of the archaeologist (Peter Cushing, the actor’s frequent onscreen adversary and real-life best friend) who has unwittingly brought him back to life. But by the time I caught up with “Horror of Dracula” (1958), I happily watched all the way through to those final moments where Cushing’s Dr. Van Helsing throws open the tall, velvet curtains and streaking sunlight falls onto Lee’s horrified Count, who lets out an unforgettable primal shriek as his body turns to ash — still one of the coolest special effects ever.

Lee went on to play Dracula another eight times, but how remarkable that he also found himself pitted against gremlins, Jedi, hobbits and even James Bond in a career that stretched from a bit part in the 1948 gothic romance “Corridor of Mirrors” all the way to last fall’s “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies.”

In most of those movies, Lee was up to no good, but with that long, lean frame and crisp English-schoolboy diction, he made menace seem positively magisterial. Then, in 2011, he was the kindly bookshop owner in Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo” — a movie about the timeless power of cinema, where Lee’s iconography loomed larger than his relatively small role. Indeed, it seemed that the actor, like cinema itself, might well go on forever, which is why his death, even at 93, still feels like a shock.

So go home tonight, turn out the lights, fire up one of Lee’s sinister classics, and raise a glass to this master of the macabre as he once again sends an incomparable shiver up your spine.

Via: Variety
By: Scott Foundas, Chief Film Critic

Sega is Using Eels to Promote ‘Alien: Isolation’ in Japan

Sega is Using Eels to Promote ‘Alien: Isolation’ in Japan

Sega is taking a page from every schoolyard bully’s handbook with their unique way of promoting the release of Alien: Isolation in Japan — yeah, they just got it — by having folks eat eels to win free copies of the game. “Free” has a radically different meaning here, as the mental trauma I might incur by eating a discount Chestburster would certainly exceed the game’s $60 price tag. read more…

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